Paint the Town Pink

October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month and according to the National Cancer Institute, one in eight women in Utah will fight the disease in her lifetime. In fact, nearly 200,000 women will be diagnosed with breast cancer this year. That’s why its vital we Paint the Town Pink together because the most effective way to fight breast cancer is to detect the disease in its early stages.

Each year, an estimated 220,000 women in the United States will be diagnosed with breast cancer and more than 40,000 will die.

One in eight women will be diagnosed with breast cancer in her lifetime.

Breast cancer is the second leading cause of death among women.

In Utah, about 250 women die from breast cancer every year.

 

 

EVENTS / WALKS / 5K’s / RUNS

> Making Strides of Utah – OCT 7, 2017
Making Strides Against Breast Cancer walks unite communities behind the American Cancer Society’s efforts to save lives. – CLICK HERE
 

> Fit for the Cure – OCT 20, 2017
Join us at your local Dillard’s to raise funds through a free fitting – CLICK HERE
 

> Pink Tie Ball – NOV 11, 2017
5th Annual Pink Tie Ball happening on Saturday November 11 at The Grand America Hotel. – CLICK HERE
 

 

 

This month, get your Pink Tip of the Day to learn the latest on breast cancer detection,
prevention, and treatment and Paint the Town Pink with FM100.3.

 

 

UNIVERSITY OF UTAH HEALTH – HELP & INFO


Keeping your Breasts Healthy
Nearly one in every eight women will be diagnosed with breast cancer in her lifetime. Fortunately, the American Cancer Society reports that breast cancer deaths are declining, most likely because of early detection and improved treatment.

Routine care for women of all ages is vital to keeping you and your breasts healthy and should include annual mammograms with clinical breast exams, in addition to regular self-examinations.

WHAT IS MAMMOGRAPHY?
Mammography (also called a mammogram) is an X-ray examination of the breast. Doctors use mammograms to detect and diagnose breast disease in women who have breast symptoms, such as a lump or pain, or for women who have no breast complaints.

A mammogram allows doctors to detect breast cancers, benign tumors, and cysts before they can be detected by touch (palpitation).

MAMMOGRAM SERVICES NEAR YOU
University of Utah Health and Huntsman Cancer Institute provide comprehensive mammograms at the Huntsman Cancer Institute and local University of Utah Health health centers. These services include the following:

Diagnostic screening for breast cancer
Care for people who have been diagnosed with breast cancer and other breast conditions
Genetic counseling, which is available if you are concerned about your chance of developing this disease based on your family history.

 

 

UTAH WOMEN’S HEALTH COALITION- HELP & INFO


Who Should Get Screened for Breast Cancer?
– The American Cancer Society’s current Breast Cancer Screening Guidelines recommend:
– Breast exam about every 3 years for women in their 20s and 30s and every year for women 40 and over
– Under the Affordable Care Act, most insurance companies, Medicare, and Medicaid cover the full cost of mammograms.
– For women with low income or without health insurance, the American Cancer Society can provide information about free or low-cost mammograms. Call 1 800-227-2345 for more information.
– The Utah Cancer Control Program offers free mammograms for women in Utah who quality. See cancerutah.org or call 1-800-717-1811, for more information.
– All women should know how their breasts normally look and feel and should report ANY breast change promptly to their doctor or nurse.
– Breast exams by a provider, breast self-exams, mammograms and other screenings increase the chances of detecting breast cancer early, when it is most likely to be curable. See cancer.org.

What are the Warning Signs of Breast Cancer?
The warning signs of breast cancer are not the same for all women. The most common symptoms are a change in the look or feel of the breast, a change in the look or feel of the nipple and nipple discharge. A list of symptoms is available at komen.org. If you have any of the symptoms, see your health care provider.